What spare tyre should you invest in?

Spare tyre tips for all drivers

A spare tyre is a spare tyre, right? Wrong. A spare tyre is a lifesaver. You carry a spare to get you out of trouble, should you suffer a puncture or tyre blowout on the road. With spare tyres, you might decide a space saver tyre is the best choice. But it’s not your only option.

There are several different types of spare tyres. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages. This article will help you decide which is best for you.

·      Full-size matching spare tyre

This is exactly what it says: a tyre that is the same as the tyres on your vehicle. Should you need to switch one of your tyres for the spare, it won’t look out of place. You won’t need to get to a tyre shop straight away to replace the spare. However, a full-size spare takes up more space than other spare tyre options.

If you have a full-size spare, you should include it in your tyre rotation regime. This will mean that when you make a full tyre change you should change five tyres and not four.

·      Full-size non-matching tyre

This is a full-size tyre that might not be on a matching wheel. You may be tempted to maintain a spare tyre that is a different size to your other tyres (within legal guidelines), though we don’t recommend this.

Like the full matching tyre, you won’t have to drive straight to a tyre shop. However, this type of spare also takes up more space in your vehicle and does nothing for aesthetics.

·      Full-size temporary spare tyre

This tyre has a shallow tread depth, and therefore a limited life as a replacement. You shouldn’t use it for anything other than emergency use, but if you do need to use it you won’t need to drive straight to a tyre shop.

A full-size temporary spare tyre should perform little differently to your other tyres, so your handling and grip is unaffected. Because they are lightweight, they are easier to handle. However, they will still take up the same amount of space as other full-size spares.

·      Compact spare tyre

This is also a lightweight tyre with a shallow tread. However, its smaller. Thus, it may be a good option for those with limited space to keep a spare in the vehicle. You’ll need to inflate it to a higher pressure, and you will also need to go to a tyre shop immediately. You should note that driving on this type of tyre could diminish driving features such as ABS braking and traction.

·      Collapsible spare tyre

This is the spare tyre that takes up the least space, so it may be a good choice if you drive a small car or have lots of luggage to carry. However, to use this type of tyre you will need to inflate it – usually with a canister. It is also only good for a limited mileage.

Tips to help you choose a spare tyre

How do you decide which tyre is best for you? Space, location and where you drive are the most important considerations. For example:

  • If you drive mostly around the city, you won’t be far from a tyre shop. So, you may decide on a lightweight, temporary spare.
  • If you plan to take a road trip across Australia or into the Outback, you’ll need a robust spare to ensure you can continue for what may be a hundred miles or more, or across rough terrain.

When buying a spare, you should ask advice from the tyre specialists at your tyre shop.

Tips for driving on a spare

You should check your spare tyre regularly, just as you do your other tyres. Make sure that it:

  • Is correctly inflated
  • Is not damaged in any way
  • Has a legal tread depth

When driving on a spare, you should drive more slowly. Some spares are not made to drive at speeds of more than 80 kilometres per hour. Remember that many spares are only for temporary use. You should get to a tyre shop as soon as possible.

If you are using a full-size spare, while you can drive further on it, you should remember that you now don’t have a fit spare tyre – so you shouldn’t delay repairing or replacing your damaged tyre.

If you need a spare tyre or have used one because of a puncture or blowout in Brisbane, contact Darra Tyres and bring your vehicle into out tyre shop for fitting by fully qualified and experienced tyre technicians.

Keeping your family and fleet safe on the road,

Kevin Wood

About the Author

Kevin has been at the forefront of the tyre industry for over 20 years. Kevin's speciality is in industrial and commercial tyres including the management and upkeep of fleets.Kevin has worked with vehicles his whole career from painting, mechanical, suspension and panel beating he has also spent time in the Australia Army as a driver. He has driven all size of vehicles throughout his career so understands the demands placed on drivers.

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